Saturday, October 28, 2017

Dirty Together Review

Dirty Together (Dirty Billionaire, #3)
By: Meghan March

My wife. 

I love saying those words.

She’s mine, and if she thinks I’m going to let her run without tracking her down and bringing her back to where she belongs—with me—then she’s about to be introduced to a new reality.

Because I’ll fight dirty to give her the happily ever after she deserves.



Again this novel picks up where the second one left off with Creighton going to find Holly. The first few chapters of this book bored me because it was predictable and didn't add much to the overall story. I started to feel the book later when Holly and Creighton finally confess to loving each other and trying to make their marriage work, regardless of their differences or the unconventional beginning they had to their relationship. 


The author really tugged at our heartstrings in this book with Holly's mom coming back into her life and trying to make money by screwing Holly and Creighton over. The writing was so well done with it that I felt Holly's pain and confusion when it came to dealing with her mother. Creighton proved himself to be caring and selfless as he tried his best to help Holly overcome the obstacles that her mother put in their way. It was gratifying to see them face their biggest obstacle together and come together as a team instead of Holly running away, as proven to be her typical response to difficult situations. 


The sex scenes of course were deliciously dirty. The author had no hesitations in being as descriptive as possible and making the scenes come alive in the minds of her readers. 


Final Rating:
✬✬✫✫✫
Probability of Rereading:
No

Thanks for reading!

Opinionated Bookworm

Dirty Pleasures Review

Dirty Pleasures (Dirty Billionaire #2)
By: Meghan March

I did it. I married a billionaire.

My reasons are my own, but the last thing I expected was to feel owned.
I may have taken vows, but I’m still determined to be me.
Now his rules are taking over my world, but I’m not the kind of girl to just obey.
There’s only one problem: I might actually be falling for him…
I have no idea how this marriage is going to go, but holding onto a piece of myself while succumbing to his dirty pleasures is shaping up to be the ride of a lifetime.



This book focused more on the plot than the sex scenes unlike the first installment. It picked up right where the first one left off with Holly taking off and leaving Creighton, so we get to see his reaction to her leaving him first hand. It was very satisfying. He fights hard to find her and get to her as quickly as he can and then when they talk about their issues and what they want for each other it's a very sweet moment. Holly was confused by Creighton's apology and calm demeanor and his willingness to please her and come up with a solution for their problem that suited them both. I feel like this moment would have been an ideal time for Creighton to admit to himself that he was in love with Holly, as it is quite clear to the readers how he feels. But we have to suffer through the rest of this book and most of the third before they both come to terms with their relationship. It's a bit frustrating.

Holly's character takes center stage in this book, as she goes on tour with her band with Creighton trailing behind her like a lost puppy. It was necessary for his character to see what hers goes through to try and make a career for herself in country music, however, it's not very befitting to his character to fall away and become a background figure in the book. I was glad that the author didn't prolong the tour narrative because it quickly became boring. 

I think this was probably the most dull book in the series and I made my way through it quickly because in a trilogy the most juicy parts happen in the beginning and the end. In keeping with that, this book was a lot of filler; some sweet moments between Creighton and Holly where you can see that they're falling for each other, even though they're doing their best not to, moments of watching Holly's career blossom, seeing a bit of Creighton's career in play, and of course, their complicated pasts coming up to haunt them. 

Again the end was another cliff hanger, the only disappointing part was that it was literally the exact same scenario as the first book. It had much more impact on me the first time, the second time her departure was foreshadowed and I was less inclined to dive into the third book as I knew what to expect with Creighton's reaction. There just wasn't as much urgency and mystery involved because we had just seen this exact situation play out before us.

Final Rating:
✬✬✫✫✫
Probability of Rereading:
No

Thanks for reading!

Opinionated Bookworm


Dirty Billionaire Review

Dirty Billionaire (Dirty Billionaire Trilogy, #1)
By: Meghan March

I've got a big dick and an even bigger bank account. That's pretty much where my bio ends. Honestly, I don't need to say anything else. I've just sold 99% of women on going home with me. 
Do I sound like an asshole to you?
That's because I am.
And guess what? It works for me just fine. 
Or at least it did.
Until I met her.
Books talk about sparks flying. Fuck that shit. With her, it was like emergency flares mixed with jet fuel. Or maybe just straight up napalm. 
Only one problem. 
She didn't leave her name or number when she disappeared from the hotel room after the hottest fucking night of my life. Now I've had a taste of unicorn pussy—the sweetest, rarest of all pussy—and I need it again.
So what's an asshole to do?
I took this problem to the street. A missed connection gone viral.
And when I find her? I'm keeping her.



I don't know what it is lately but I've been obsessed with the free books on Kobo, and my go-to for downloads always seem to be of the romance variety. And lately the dirtier the better! I've been reading so much delicious smut lately that my other half has taken to making sure the kids aren't in the room before asking questions about my latest read. I downloaded this book because of the gorgeous looking model on the cover, knowing that if the male character in the book was portrayed as looking anything like the cover model I was going to love it no matter what the contents. The author did not let me down.

Creighton is a pretty close replica of Christian Grey, rich beyond your wildest dreams, emotionally closed off, kinky beyond belief and gorgeous. He's also domineering, over confident and controlling. But somehow the author makes even those qualities seem endearing as she weaves a complicated love story between Creighton and Holly. Holly is a country bumpkin trying to make something of herself when she gets caught in the hype of the music industry and forced into a situation she can't seem to find a way out of. Luckily for her Creighton comes along with a proposal of his own, quite literally, and it seems like it could be the answer to all of her problems. 

At first I was struck by all the similarities that this book shares with 50 Shades (which I loved, by the way, so that's not necessarily a bad thing), but then the book took on it's own identity when the love story grew quite differently than that of 50 Shades. The characters are sort of thrown together by Creighton's sexual attraction to Holly and Holly's need to escape her fake relationship before it ruins her reputation. They have a shot gun wedding and then it gets a little messy from there. I was happy to see that Holly is more independent than Creighton expected and she has a hard time following his rules and even rebels against him, making him work harder to keep her happy so that she stays. But he maintains that he doesn't have feelings for her and that the relationship is one based on mutual physical pleasure. And they have no issues that that part of things. Creighton dominates in the bedroom and that seems to be the only place that Holly is ok with his domineering personality. 

My only real qualm with the book is that Creighton takes his dominance to the extreme and comes off as being really cruel sometimes. Holly calls him on it, which is good, but at the same time she takes that verbal abuse as if accepting it as her due. In the beginning Creighton seems more interested in keeping her on as a hired-whore, having her be available for his sexual pleasure at any time, and doesn't think of her as being a human and having her own thoughts and feelings. He also goes through the whole book knowing that he feels differently about Holly but refusing to admit to himself that it's because he has any sort of feeling or attachment to her. 

Honestly, I didn't realize I was all that invested in the novel until I got to the cliffhanger at the end, and I didn't even consider moving on to my next downloaded book. I needed to know what happened so badly that I went directly to Kobo and bought the next two books in the series. I read the whole series in the span of about 7 hours, taking breaks to live my life, of course. The author did a great job of reeling me in and making the book worth my while.

Final Rating:
✬✬✬✫✫
Probability of Rereading:
Yes

Thanks for reading!

Opinionated Bookworm

Thursday, October 26, 2017

The Dom who loved me Review

The Dom who loved me (Masters & Mercenaries #1)
By: Lexi Blake

A routine mission…

Sean Taggart is hunting a deadly terrorist, and his only lead is the lovely Grace Hawthorne. She's the executive assistant for an employment agency Sean suspects is a front for illegal activities. To get the truth, he is going to have to get very close to Grace, a task he is all too eager to undertake when he discovers her deliciously submissive nature.

…turns into a dangerous seduction.

Soon, Grace Hawthorne is living a double life. By day, she is the widowed mother of two college-aged sons. By night, she submits to Sean's every dark desire. She's living out her wildest fantasies of pleasure—intimate acts of trust she's only read about. As passion engulfs her, a murderer strikes, and Grace learns that Sean has a deeply hidden agenda. Will Sean choose his mission and break her heart or be the Master of her dreams?



Have you ever noticed that erotic novels always seem to be chock full of steamy sex scenes a not a whole lot else? It's like the author puts their all into mapping out every minute detail of the couplings in the books but when it comes to the plot of the story they're all tapped out of ideas. Let me tell you, this was not one of those books. I was impressed that not only did this book have a plot line that made sense to the story, it was also a decent enough one that even without the sex I would still have been interested in reading this novel.

That being said, there were definitely some really racy scenes. There was a couple of times when I blushed while reading, and looked around to make sure no one was reading over my shoulder. How I would have explained what I was reading to someone if they had been snooping is beyond me. One thing is for sure, the author had no qualms at all about using whatever vocabulary she so desired. And it was fabulous.

One of my favorite things about this book was the physical attributes of the characters. The author describes the main character, Grace, as being slightly overweight and her counterpart, Sean, as being as fit as can be. It gets so old to read about these tiny women and fit men as if these types of men wouldn't find an average body type just as appealing as a petite one. I also liked the Grace was self conscious of her age and being in a relationship with a younger man. It added some realism to the characters and their story. 

In the end while I did enjoy the book I don't know that I would go out and buy the rest of the series. I wasn't invested in the characters enough to wonder about their fate beyond what the author wrote about in this book. 

Final Rating:
✬✬✬✫✫
Probability of Rereading:
Yes

Thanks for reading!

Opinionated Bookworm

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Nightwalker (Stormwalker, #4) Review

Nightwalker (Stormwalker, #4)
By: Allyson James

Stormwalker Janet Begay, proprietor of the Crossroads Hotel, a place where the paranormal stop for a safe night’s rest, discovers the hard way that a slayer is targeting Ansel, a Nightwalker who’s become the hotel's more-or-less permanent resident.

When Janet and her lover Mick intervene to save Ansel’s un-life, they find that the attack is the beginning of an oncoming storm. Janet has her hands full already with the upcoming marriage of her father, the return of a woman who claims to be Coyote’s wife, her crazy half-sister, a couple dragons on her back, and her worry about Mick, who’s behaving strangely again.

But it seems that everyone is after Ansel, who fears he killed the woman he loves in a Nightwalker frenzy. Janet must choose between protecting Ansel, or facing the most powerful magical beings in the world, who are willing to destroy Janet, Mick, her hotel, and everyone she cares about to get to Ansel and his secrets.
 



This book was available for free download on Kobo and the cover looked like it would be right up my alley. Unfortunately neither the cover, nor the name of the book uncovered the fact that was book is the fourth book in a series that probably makes a lot more sense when read in conjunction with the others. It was annoying and distracting to have to read small flashbacks of the story sprinkled throughout the first half of the book. Although, admittedly, without those I would have been completely lost. Had I have known that it was the fourth book in a series I'd never heard of I would not have bothered reading it.

Most of my drawbacks with this book come from the fact that I did not read the preceding novels and as such did not get to experience the relationships between the characters as deeply as I may have had I read the earlier volumes of their stories. Writing this review is made a little difficult and my view a little skewed because of that, but take this review in with a grain of salt and remember I only got to read a small part of the characters stories.

The different factions that the author created were pretty impressive, and the powers they possess even more so. It never fails to amaze me the sort of original ideas that authors can come up with that I haven't yet heard of. And the characters in this story are no exception. I loved the idea of dragons being able to shift into human form, and the idea of stormwalkers that can command the power of the elements, and Gods moving about on the earth in human forms. It all seemed so much larger than life and it was the main pull of the book for me. 

There were a number of things I did not enjoy about this book, the least of which was the scene at the end of the book when the Goddess, Dragons, Stormwalker, and mages all came together in what I had anticipated to be a massive battle and showing of power. I felt that there was too much going on between all the different characters and the scene was hard to follow as the descriptions spanned across all characters and tried to encompass all of their powers and doings. Another, was the bizarre sexual relationship between Mick and Janet. Maybe in one of the earlier books it addresses why it is so strange, but it was hard to figure out in this book. Does having Mick having sex with Janet heal her? Even still does that exempt him from having to have her express permission before he forces himself on her? There was one particular scene where Janet returns home too exhausted to walk or speak and Mick cleans her up, puts her to bed and without her even being able to move her own limbs, has sex with her. It just read like a rape scene to me, and made me think a lot less of their relationship.

Ultimately regardless of the fascinating characters and descriptive narrative I had a hard time getting through this book and came up bored quite a few times with it. Again, had I had read the first books maybe my opinion of it would be different. 

Final Rating:
✬✬✫✫✫
Probability of Rereading:
No

Thanks for reading!

Opinionated Bookworm

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Not so Fragile Review

Not so Fragile
By: Maq Lancaster

Letting people in is a daunting task for Valerie Morrison, and probably always will be. Confrontations are just never on her side, and she has enough scars—both physical and emotional—to prove it. That's why she chooses to avoid people whenever possible. Now studying at a university not too far from home, Val's plan is simple: keep her head low. Should be easy...

Except it isn't.

Because there's this guy named Louis (Lou for short) who is as kind as he is beautiful. Somehow, he looks beyond her walls and reaches in... and has other plans of just letting her be.

Here's the problem: Val doesn't do relationships, and she isn't planning on getting into one anytime soon, regardless of how tempting it may seem. At the end of the day, getting involved with Lou in any way can't be worth it... Right? 


*NOTE: This 74,000+ word standalone novel deals with a sensitive subject matter.


I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

I surprised myself by reading through this book very quickly, not because I'm not a fast reader, but because although I enjoyed it I wasn't pulled into it like I usually am with quick reads. I enjoyed the plot and the characters and even the little bit of darkness that the author worked in with the mental health and drug dependency issues. About half way through the book I had the faint sense of familiarity, as though I had read this book or one like it before. It reminded me a lot of Beautiful Disaster by Jamie McGuire. It shared a lot of the same hallmarks of her book with the setting and the pattern of the relationship between the main characters, the only thing I found lacking was the depth of love between the main characters.

In this book the author did a great job at detailing the struggle's of the main character Val, and wrote about her obstacles in a sensitive way that can definitely resonate with readers who have dealt with similar issues. I was rooting for Val's success and survival early on as it's hard to read a story like hers and not want her to become stronger in spite of everything she has had to live through. I love books that detail a characters endeavor to better themselves all while lending the reader some inspiration to overcome anything that they may currently be facing. There is something very powerful in the writing of a fictional character that gives audiences hope and strength in their own personal lives. 

I was surprised to see that the love story, although plagued by Val's reluctance to have a love life, was still able to blossom and grow; helping Val become stronger in her pursuance of a "normal" life. Lou was the perfect counterpart for her, and although he had issues of his own he made her a stronger, better person. My only misgiving with their story is that at the end Val stopped seeking independence and leaned more on Lou than she should. It's a beautiful idea that at 18 they would live 'happily ever after' but the rest of the book deals in realism and the end of the book should have as well. I was left feeling that if Lou and Val broke up in the future Val would be back at square one; lost, lonely and drug dependent. 

As much as I appreciate a good love story, this book was much more about the real life problems that the characters encountered. The author did not shy away from writing bluntly about heavy subject matters, and was sympathetic in the treatment of the characters. It made for a very dynamic read.

Final Rating:
✬✬✬✫✫
Probability of Rereading:
No

Thanks for reading!

Opinionated Bookworm

Rogue Review (Relentless #3)

Rogue (Relentless #3)
By: Karen Lynch

Sara Grey is done hiding and done being afraid. The Master thinks he has her running scared, but she’s taking matters into her own hands and taking her life back. With the help of her friends, she sets out to find the one person who can answer her questions about her past, and who may be able to lead them to the Master.


On her journey, Sara faces new challenges and dangers, and learns that the world of good and evil is not as clear cut as she had believed. She makes new friends, unexpected allies, and reconnects with people from her past. As her powers continue to change and grow, she transforms from a struggling girl into a strong young warrior.


But at what cost? How much is Sara willing to sacrifice in her need for independence and her quest for the truth? And will her newfound strength be enough to save her and the people she loves when she finally comes face-to-face with her powerful nemesis? Nothing could have prepared her for what is to come, and it will take everything in her to survive the final test of courage and love.




In this third, and final installment of the trilogy, we get a real sense of the power that Sara possesses and it's fantastic. Sara is growing stronger than she ever imagined she could be, and takes on some pretty formidable opponents on her quest to find her mother for information. Her power goes beyond anything that has ever been seen before as her mix of heritage is completely unique to her, which makes her the perfect match for Nikolas who is hailed as the best warrior of the Mohiri. 

My only complaint about this book is that I was bored throughout some of Sara's road trip adventure with her friends. The introduction of new characters, new enemies and new species were interesting but the journey and some of the conflicts she experienced were a bit more sluggish than I had expected them to be. I found the whole Greg scenario dull and pointless, it served no real purpose in the grand scheme of things. Although my lack of enthusiasm could have been because of the absence of Sara and Nikolas scenes. The redeeming factor for me was the extra use of Sara's powers. 

My absolute favorite part of the book came at the end with what I call "the big fight scene". Sara finally meets the ultimate evil character that has been, unknowingly to her, plaguing her throughout the series. The scene was so powerful that I reread it three times to make sure I didn't miss any part of it, and I cried every time. The narrative is unbelievable as the author makes Sara's pain so palpable the the reader can't help but her agony as well as every other emotion that runs through Sara as she experiences the worst loss and biggest fight of her life. Her character really blossoms in this scene as her power eclipses anything that we have seen from her thus far making her character truly awe-inspiring and terrifying all at the same time. 

With this book being the first novel that Sara and Nikolas were a couple in I was completely hooked on all of their scenes together. The depth of their feelings for each other really became apparent midway through this book. Their characters had a lot of obstacles to overcome, the least of which was Nikolas' annoying need to protect Sara from everything effectively smothering her in the process, but their characters really complimented each other. I loved that they were open and honest with each other and effectively went from arguing about their difference of opinions to discussing them with each other and trying to come up with solutions that they could both live with. It felt like a very realistic and undramatic way to deal with problems and was refreshing to read about in a novel that thrived on the dramatic. 

I was so sad when I came to the end of this book because I didn't want it to be over. I wanted to stay in the Mohiri world with Sara and Nikolas and was ecstatic when I got to a preview at the end of the novel for Warrior, the next Relentless book. Stay tuned for my review on it!

Final Rating:
✬✬✬✬✬
Probability of Rereading:
Yes

Thanks for reading!

Opinionated Bookworm

Taking the Reins Review (The Rosewood's #1)

Taking the Reins (The Rosewood's #1)
By: Katrina Abbott

Brooklyn Prescott (if that’s even her real name) is the new girl at The Rosewood Academy for Academic Excellence, now that she’s moved back to the States after two years living in London. Rosewood, a boarding school for children of the rich and famous and known for its celebutantes, is missing just one element important to any junior’s education: boys. But luckily for Brooklyn, and the rest of the Rosewood girls, there’s a boys’ boarding school, The Westwood Academy, just a few miles away. 

On her very first day, Brooklyn meets Will, a gorgeous and flirty boy on campus to help with move in. But is he who she thinks he is? And what about Brady, the cute stable boy? Or Jared, the former child actor with his grown-up good looks who can always make her laugh? As Brooklyn settles in at Rosewood, she’s faced with new friends, new challenges and new opportunities to make herself into the girl she always wanted to be. Whoever that might be.

Taking The Reins is the first installment of The Rosewoods, an exciting new Young Adult series for readers who love fun, flirty love stories.




I have been on a Young Adult kick lately and this book was available for free download on Kobo, so I thought why not? And immediately after finishing it, which was only about 1.5-2 hours after I started I regretted downloading it. Don't get me wrong, I enjoyed the plot, characters and setting, what I don't enjoy is being pulled into a story and it ending before anything happens. If you know me and my penchant for over-exaggeration I'm sure you're thinking that I am overstating, but I assure you I'm not. 

The author began character building, creating friendships and the beginning of what promised to be some very juicy and dramatic story lines just to end the book before the beginning of the story had even finished being told. I understand that the author needs to create some sort of cliffhanger at the end of the first book to entice their readers to buy the second, but what she created in this book was completely unsatisfying and instead of drawing me in it repelled me. I will not be buying any other books in this series because, although I do want to know what happens with the characters, I am not interested in having to buy an unlimited number of short books just to know if the main character and her off-limits love interest end up together. 

Had the book lasted long enough for even one of the story lines to play out I do think that the writing of the story would have drawn me in enough to actually care about the characters. I liked the playful and fun air of the book and of the characters themselves. And I found myself favouring one of Brooklyn's potential love interests over others. Unfortunately, the good writing was not enough to redeem this book for me, and I wouldn't recommend it to anyone else to read. 

Final Rating:
✬✬✫✫✫
Probability of Rereading:
No

Thanks for reading!

Opinionated Bookworm

Monday, October 23, 2017

Warrior Review (Relentless #4)

Warrior (A Relentless Novel)
By: Karen Lynch

The warrior has finally met his match.

Nikolas Danshov is the Mohiri’s finest warrior, fearless and lethal with any weapon. For almost two hundred years, he has devoted his life to keeping humans safe from the demons that walk the earth. Revered by his people, he is a legend in his own time, a warrior undefeated in battle, and prepared for anything. Until her.

On a routine job in Maine, a twist of fate brings Nikolas face-to-face with the one person he had never expected to meet – his mate. Sara Grey is unlike anyone he’s ever met. Beautiful and fiery, she ignites his desire, while her innocence and vulnerability awaken a fierce protectiveness in him. Now all he can think of is keeping his mate safe from the dangers that hunt her, even if she fights him at every turn.

You know Sara’s story. Now read it again, through the eyes of her warrior.




I LOVE when author's do this! Writing the same story from the point of view of the other main character. It adds so much to the story that we didn't get from only reading it from Sara's view. I found the original trilogy addicting enough even without this addition that I was practically salivating when I found out that I could read it all again from Nikolas' perspective. Finally, I got to know what he had been thinking throughout everything that he and Sara went through. And if I'm being honest, it made my crush on him a million times stronger than the original series. The author created his character with such depth that the reader really doesn't get to see until they read this book. It answers any and all lingering questions one may have about his reactions and moods from the very beginning of meeting Sara right through to the aftermath of 'the big fight scene'. 

A fun addition to this book was the introduction of Nikolas' parents. They are talked about in Sara's version, but it isn't until we get to see Nikolas's side of the story that we get to see his interaction with them and get a feel for the kind of people they are. Their relationship with each other and their son really confirms the sense of family, love and devotion that Nikolas wants in his life with Sara. This book also gives the reader a look at his initial aversion to his feelings for Sara and why he was as aloof as he was throughout the books. The author shows us that he struggled with his bond with Sara as much as she did as he had never wanted to be bonded in the first place. Which again, adds something extra to their already beautiful love story.

I liked that the author threw in additional stories with characters that Nikolas knew from his past, such as Vivian and their past casual relationship. It gave his character some realism and background and showed that he existed just fine before he met Sara, although he had been vaguely aware that something had been missing from his life. 

Although this book wasn't necessary to the series I really think that it adds so much more to the series and am so glad that the author wrote this version of events.

Final Rating:
✬✬✬✬✬ 
Probability of Rereading:
Yes

Thanks for reading!

Opinionated Bookworm

Refuge Review (Relentless #2)

Refuge (Relentless #2)
By: Karen Lynch

To keep the people she loved safe, Sara left everything she knew behind. She soon learns this new world is nothing like her old one, and she struggles to make a place for herself among the Mohiri. But it soon becomes apparent to Sara and to everyone one around her that she is not your typical warrior.

As the weeks pass, Sara builds new relationships, copes with her new trainers, and tries to manage her ever-changing powers, while keeping her unique heritage a secret. Looming in the background is the constant shadow of the Master who will do anything to find her.

Sara finds herself on a journey of self-discovery that uncovers her true strengths and awakens a part of her she never knew existed. She experiences the delight of new friendships, the sweetness and pain of first love, and a loss so deep it could be the thing that finally breaks her. At the end of it all, she discovers that the one place she was supposed to be safe might not be the refuge she thought it was.


This was a fantastic book that really illustrated the incredible amount of character growth that Sara experienced. Being the second book in the Relentless trilogy it picked up a couple weeks after the first book left off, easing some of the misgivings that the reader was left with at the end of the first novel. We got to see how Sara was handling living with her own people in a foreign environment surrounded by strangers. What started off as a story of loneliness and frustration quickly grew into an uplifting story of personal development as Sara worked hard to better herself in her training and make new friends. 


My favorite parts were all the happenings with Nikolas. The author plays his character close to her chest as she constantly leaves us guessing as to what his thoughts and emotions are. He comes across as being overprotective of Sara, making us think that he wants nothing more than to be with her, then he has some sort of arbitrary mood swing and becomes hostile and aggressive making us think that Sara is more of an annoying obligation to him. Sara's feelings, on the other hand, are pretty clear to the reader as we have the advantage of a front seated view of the story from her point of view. I was beyond satisfied with the ending of this story and again, could not wait to download and read the third installment of this series. 


The author introduced a lot of new characters in this book, and kept my old favorites involved as well, as she included Roland and Peter in this story as much as they had been in the first. She created Sara's first female best friend, Jordan, and her character is as captivating as Sara is, with the added bonus of a great sense of humour. There was something deeply satisfying to watching Sara create a deep and lasting friendship with a member of her own people, knowing that this bond was part of the foundation of her new life as Mohiri. It was also beneficial to see her discover and get to know family members from her mothers side that she wasn't aware existed. Part of what makes Sara's character so valuable is the bonds that she creates with almost all of the people and animals that she meets. She is such a caring individual that even the most standoffish of creatures is drawn to her.


This book ends in a cliff hanger that keeps the reader needing to know more about Sara's adventures. Especially where Nikolas is involved, as their story seems as if it's finally developing beyond friendship before it's cut short by Sara running away. 

Final Rating:
✬✬✬✬✬
Probability of Rereading:
Yes

Be on the lookout for my review of the third book of the trilogy!
Thanks for reading!

Opinionated Bookworm

Relentless Review

Relentless
By: Karen Lynch

Sara Grey’s world shattered ten years ago when her father was brutally murdered. Now at seventeen, she is still haunted by memories of that day and driven by the need to understand why it happened. She lives a life full of secrets and her family and friends have no idea of the supernatural world she is immersed in or of Sara’s own very powerful gift.

In her quest for answers about her father’s death, Sara takes risks that expose her and her friends to danger and puts herself into the sights of a sadistic vampire. On the same fateful night she meets Nikolas, a warrior who turns Sara’s world upside down and is determined to protect her even if it’s the last thing she wants.

Sara’s life starts to spin out of control as she is hunted by an obsessed vampire, learns that her friends have secrets of their own and reels from the truth about her own ancestry. Sara has always been fiercely independent but in order to survive now she must open herself to others, to reveal her deepest secrets. And she must learn to trust the one person capable of breaking down the walls around her.



I recently went on a downloading spree on Kobo's free books section and came across this book. The synopsis sounded like something I'd be into, but I had no idea how much I would come to love this book. It's the first book in a trilogy, and immediately after reading this one I downloaded the rest. I can already sense that these are going to become a favoured set of mine. I have already asked my other half to buy the hard copy books, to add to my library and read the series twice in the last week. That's right, I'm obsessed. And if you read them, you will be too. 


This is my favorite book to reread in the set as I always love the beginning of any story, most especially a love story. I love the new feelings, new characters, and watching the relationships and bonds between characters develop and grow. I was instantly able to form an attachment to the main character, Sara, as she was immediately portrayed as a caring and selfless individual. Her back story is chock full of the tragedy of the abandonment of her mother and the death of her dad; and her focus on finding out who killed her dad makes her story an endearing and moving one. 


Of course, my weak spot is satiated with a strong, attractive male character, Nikolas,  that Sara feels herself being drawn to, without completely understanding why. The reader is taken through the beginning of their tumultuous relationship and the story is told so descriptively that the reader will, no doubt, find themselves taking on Sara's emotions. There were quite a few times when Sara was crying that I felt myself tearing up (while trying to hide my emotional state from my other half who would no doubt tease me for feeling so deeply about fictional characters). The end of the book, although not a completely sad ending, had me bawling like a baby. I'm being very literal here. I was a sobbing, snotty mess as I finished this book and immediately jumped on the Kobo store to buy the next book, there was no way I was going to be able to go to bed without knowing what happened to Sara next!


Sara's friends were among my favorite characters in this book, and I found myself looking forward to any parts of the book involving Roland. I'm not going to try to hide it from you, I definitely developed a crush on his character as well as Nikolas and Chris'. The author created some very engaging and admirable characters that I cannot seem to get enough of (just ask my credit card!). One of the things I liked best about the book was the idea that Sara could be best friends with two male characters and keep things platonic the whole time, and Peter and Roland accepted that. It was refreshing to see that although they were both protective of her and cared deeply for her their relationship was that of siblings and nothing more. 

There was not a single thing that I did not like about this book, and I would not hesitate to recommend it to anyone looking for a good read. 

Final Rating:
✬✬✬✬✬
Probability of Rereading:
Yes

Thanks for reading!

Opinionated Bookworm

Battle Schooled! Review

Battle Schooled! (Chronicles of the Floating Continent #3)
By: Billy Wong

Rousing fantasy adventure with a few butt-kicking heroines.

Rupert, a young loner with a dark history, is sent by his parents to the University of Ostuh in hopes of him learning to be less withdrawn. He continues to avoid social contact until an extraordinary encounter with Meg and Patrick, famed monster hunters turned students. Making new friends for the first time in years, he and the duo navigate school life alongside other standouts such as warrior noble Charlene Lyonesse and Peggy "PP" Petunia, a tiny pigtailed girl with a big secret. When a series of brutal murders rocks the university, the students must come together to stop the deadly threat.



I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

Usually I'm a one-book-at-a-time kinda girl, but the book that I am currently reading isn't doing much to keep my attention and I happened to see the intriguing cover for Battle Schooled on my e-reader, so I decided to take a break from my book and read something new. I was hoping it would jog my reading juices again and help me regain my focus enough to help me get through my original read. Unfortunately, it did not do that. I read Battle Schooled within a few hours, and had to fight myself the whole way through to keep going and not to give up and start a third book. I should also tell you that I had never heard of Chronicles of the Floating Continent before cracking open this book, and if this book plays off previous ones I had no idea. However, there weren't any times that I felt as though I had missed anything by not reading the first novels in the series and found that this book could easily act as a stand-alone read.

My main obstacle with this book was how boring it was. It was based on a group of kids in some sort of school, of which the main purpose of in the kids lives was unclear. The author did mention a few times however, that teaching fighting skills was a secondary venture, so perhaps it was all about a standard curriculum of maths, science and language? Who knows. Either way, the fighting that takes place in the novel overtook anything else that the school may have been about. The fighting itself was also pretty anticlimactic for the most part. A lot of the fights took place between the students who had challenged each other based on ego and then when they lost became friends with each other. Even the fights that happened against more arduous opponents were anticlimactic and sometimes hard to follow as so many characters got involved in them and so many different fight moves intertwined with other characters. Sometimes it was easier to skip over the fighting narrative to the aftermath of it than to read the action scenes themselves. 

The cast of characters includes Rupert, who begins as the main character as the book seemingly takes place from his point of view, but that sometimes changes, especially towards the end and becomes more a third person account. His character begins as being mysterious and feared and apparently rightly so, as he has the ability to become uncontrollably dangerous. The author seems to play with the idea of making Rupert one of the strongest and most intimidating students in the school, as he is unwilling to lose in a fight, no matter the cost to himself or his opponent. However, in the only real fights he takes part in he seems no better or worse a warrior than any of his comrades, making the author's build up of his abilities all for not. Meg and PP become the heroines of the story as their abilities seem larger than life, but they both also have winning personalities making them the most like-able characters in the book. The author introduced Charlene as a superior snob, and her character maintains that trait to the end of the story but along the way she also becomes a snitch, a challenger, a comrade and her ego takes a nose dive making her seem weak and pathetic. None of the characters evoked any real emotion from me, and I really didn't care whether any of them lived or died in the story.

I did like the concept of the book, and found the idea to be fairly original. But the author seemed to change his mind too often during the writing in this book making it seem as though the evolution of the characters and the trials they faced went in circles, never really progressing past their introduction. All together it was a dull read and I was grateful that it was a shorter book, had it have been any longer and I don't think I could have finished it.

Final Rating:
✬✬✫✫✫
Probability of Rereading:
No

Thanks for reading!

Opinionated Bookworm

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Guilty Pleasures Blog

I was scrolling through my Facebook homepage the other day and came across a post from Goodreads about guilty pleasure reading, and at the end of the post they threw in a question asking their readers what guilty pleasure books they enjoy. I scrolled through some of the comments and read what other people's guilty pleasures are. I always enjoy seeing other's opinions on books and have taken some great recommendations from these types of posts. However, I very rarely participate in these types of comment threads. Books are very open to interpretation and opinion and no two people's views are the same. So, while I enjoy reading and reviewing I do not enjoy feeling as though I have to justify my opinion to others about my likes and dislikes of books. 

I'm not going to lie, a lot of my guilty pleasure's are also at the top of a lot of people's 'worst books' lists. And that's ok. I am well aware that a large majority of readers hate the Twilight books, but I don't. A lot of readers hate Fifty Shades of Grey, again I don't. And in the past when I have voiced my opinion to fellow avid readers about how I have enjoyed both of these series' enough to have reread them both multiple times (enough that I can almost quote them verbatim) I am met with disdain and ridicule. As though my opinion should coincide with popular opinion and I should automatically see the "horrible writing" and "unhealthy relationships" that these books contain. 

I remember quite a few instances where people have gotten offended at the fact that I enjoy reading Fifty Shades of Grey, specifically. I have had to defend myself a few times as the conversations have gotten quite pointed as the other person accused me of being complacent to reading about physical abuse and rape, none of which I perceived as happening in these books. But it certainly begs the question, since when does reading about a certain subject matter, and enjoying the book as a whole make the reader a party to the misdeeds that the author writes about? I sometimes enjoy a good fantasy novel, does that make me a witch? I have been known to enjoy a good murder mystery, does that make me a murderer? Why does reading about a co-dependent BDSM relationship and genuinely enjoying the book make me a bad person? Why does it call my personality and moral compass into question? It's baffling to me. And it's led me to distance myself from admitting to enjoying these lesser regarded books as it never ends well.

I often tell people that Jackie Collins is one of my favorite guilty pleasure reads authors, and she is. Her books always include over the top sex scenes, mystery, murder and debauchery; and she was never one to mince words. Her books are all fantastic. And oddly, people seem more apt to accepting this than some of my poorer rated and more mainstream selections. It feels like whenever opinions of mine jibe with the opinions of whomever I'm talking to, then they're accepted. Danielle Steele is a great example of this. I don't think I know a single female who hasn't read a Danielle Steele novel. She always creates a beautiful idyllic world where her female main characters experience heartache of some kind and then work their way back to happiness by overhauling their lives and in the end get the happy ending that the reader wants them to have. You can tell any female that Danielle Steele is your favorite guilty pleasure author and the response will almost always be "I love her books!", because who doesn't love a courageous story with a happy ending tacked on at the end? Especially when she adds a heavy dose of 'girl power' in them. 

Another guilty pleasure of mine, that I almost never reveal to anyone is Harlequin romance novels. I remember once an elderly neighbour of mine gave me a box of books that she wanted to get rid of and they were a solid 85% HR novels. This was my first exposure to the culture of Harlequin. And it really is it's own culture. At the second hand book store that I frequent Harlequin has it's own section away from the rest of the romance novels. I don't own many, actually come to think of it I may not own any at all, and I never buy them. But if one happens to be passed on to me, I definitely give it a quick read before passing it on to someone else. And I have yet to read a HR that I didn't like. If you've read my reviews I'm sure you're not surprised by this revelation, I'm clearly a sucker for romance. And based on my previous confessions of my enjoyment of Fifty Shades and Twilight the more passionate and unrealistic the love story is the more I love it. 

That's what a guilty pleasure read is all about. It plays to your likes, your wants, your fetishes. It satisfies something within you that you shouldn't have to be embarassed about, but you are; which is why it becomes a "guilty" pleasure. I accept the fact that my guilty pleasures, likes and dislikes may not correspond with everyone's, and I think that's great. I am always open to considering other people's opinions. But please, don't make people feel bad for liking something that you may or may not agree with. We are all different, and see things differently. Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm feeling inclined to reread Twilight for the millionth time. 

Have a good day and thanks for reading!

Opinionated Bookworm

Saturday, October 14, 2017

This is Where it Ends Review

This is Where it Ends
By: Marieke Nijkamp

10:00 a.m. The principal of Opportunity High School finishes her speech, welcoming the entire student body to a new semester and encouraging them to excel and achieve.

10:02 a.m. The students get up to leave the auditorium for their next class.

10:03 a.m. The auditorium doors won't open.

10:05 a.m. Someone starts shooting.

Told from four different perspectives over the span of fifty-four harrowing minutes, terror reigns as one student’s calculated revenge turns into the ultimate game of survival.



For the first time in what feels like forever, although realistically is probably only a few months, I wandered into my local bookstore - Manticore Books- and perused the Young Adult section looking for something new to read that I'd never heard of before. I passed up the all Sarah J Maas' that I've been impatiently waiting to add to my collection in favour of This is Where it Ends. There was no price on this specific book so I had to ask the clerk how much it was (really, my boyfriend asked while I continued pulling book after book off the shelf to read the back covers) and I was more intrigued by the clerk's assessment of how disturbing it is that a book about a school shooting is readily available in the YA section of the store than the synopsis itself. I don't think my quick glance at the synopsis even really registered with me as to what I was reading until she pointed out the genre that I had been looking in. 

I didn't begin reading the book until late afternoon and I had it finished in about three hours. I didn't want to put it down. I am always a little put off by reading different POV's, especially as many as four, but in this book it became clear early on that four points of view were essential to get the full sense of what each of the characters is experiencing. It took me a couple of chapters to really grasp who each character was and memorize the names of the people in their stories, my memory is not my greatest attribute so it was perhaps a little more difficult for me than it may be for the average person, but once I got a feel for the characters and their lives I was able to grasp the situation from their standpoint much better. Given the small amount of time allotted to each character it was more difficult to form an affinity to any of them until midway to three quarters into the book, and even then while I certainly felt for what each of them was going through, I found myself caring more about the character based on how close to the actual shooting and shooter they were, both physically and emotionally. 

The only real disappointment I felt at all was the lack of story given to the shooter. Most of the other characters accounts all contained bad memories of the shooter making it seem as though he was just a bad person, with the exception of Claire whom he had dated. She had a few good memories but even those are tinged with the sense that there was something fundamentally wrong with the shooter, almost like it was predetermined at birth that he was going to do something dramatically wrong and hurt people. Adding a fifth POV from the shooters perception may have been beneficial in giving him a story, a reason to do what he did instead of it just being chalked up to a personality defect. 

I think one thing that people need to remember when they read this book is that it is a work of fiction. The author did not create this as a representation of every school shooting that has ever happened. It is something she made up. A story. This book no more portrays every school shooting than a romance novel portrays every romantic relationship in existence. The author did a great job in her descriptive of the thoughts and feelings that the students experienced and was sympathetic in her writing. It is a hard subject matter to write about, harder to write about it in a respectful way that isn't offensive to the audience, and the author did a great job with this book.  

Final Rating:
✬✬✬✬✫
Probability of Rereading:
Yes

Thanks for reading!

Opinionated Bookworm

House of Darken (Secret Keepers #1) Review

House of Darken (Secret Keepers #1) By: Jaymin Eve When Emma moves to Astoria, Oregon, she is given two rules:  #1 – Don’t cross to “th...